The Argument for Curry as a Unicorn

In our previous post we posed the potential for Stephen Curry to become a Unicorn (in venture this is a company that reaches $1 billion in value). While it was mostly for fun, on reflection we decided that it actually could prove valid. This post will walk you through why an athlete like Curry (or potentially James Harden, Russell Westbrook or Anthony Davis) could become a Unicorn should they be elevated to the elite status of a LeBron James.

curry unicorn

The Precedent for Creating a Corporation Owning an Athlete’s Earnings Exists

In April 2014, Vernon Davis offered stock in his future earnings via a venture with Fantex, Inc. as part of a new financial instrument being sold by Fantex. Davis offered a 10% share of all future earnings from his brand marketing company to Fantex, which would then turn around and divide it into shares of a tracking stock that can be traded within their own exchange. The offering was 421,100 shares, valued at $10 each, for a total of $4.2 million. This implied a total value of the “Vernon Davis Corporation” of $42 million. Davis’ current salary is $4.7 million and endorsement income about $1.75 million for a total income of $6.5 million. Given that the longevity of football players is rarely into their mid-thirties coupled with Davis being over 30 at the time, it seems likely that he had no more than 3-4 years left in his playing career. Putting those facts together makes it appear that Davis was unlikely to earn much more than $42 million going forward and might earn less as we would expect his income to drop precipitously once he retired. So buying the stock was probably viewed as more of a symbol of support for Davis and its “market cap” appears about equal to his expected future earnings.

NBA Stars are Among the Highest Earning Athletes’

The current highest earner of endorsements in the NBA is LeBron James at about $44 million per year (Kevin Durant is second at $35 million). The highest contract in the league is Kobe Bryant at about $23 million per year (and had been $30 million previously) with the 10 highest players in the league making an average of over $21 million. Given the new TV contract scheduled to go into effect in the 2016-2017 season, it’s been projected that the cap will increase from about  $63 million today to $90 million in 2017 and be nearly $140 million by 2025 (10 years from now, at age 37, Curry should still be playing). Let’s make the following assumptions:

  1. Curry’s salary will go from a current level of $11 million in 2015 and 12 million in 2016 (4 other Warriors will be paid more that year) to about $30 million in 2017 assuming the top salaries tend to be about 1/3 of their team’s cap as they are today.
  2. It will be up to $40 million in 2025, or less than 1/3 the projected $140 million cap.
  3. His endorsements will reach midway between the current levels experienced by LeBron and Durant, to about $40 million by 2017 (they are currently at about $5.5 million from Under Armour)
  4. His endorsement income will rise by about 10%/year subsequently, through 2025 to reach $92 million in 2025
  5. He will continue to earn endorsement income (but will retire from playing) subsequent to the 2025 season.
  6. The level post 2025 will average $60 million per year for 10 years and then go to zero.

The last assumption is based on observing the income of retired stars like Michael Jordan (earning $100 million/year 12 years after retirement), David Beckham (earned about $75 million the first year after retiring), Arnold Palmer (earned $42 million/year 40 years after winning his last tournament), Shaq ($21 million), Magic Johnson is now worth over $500 million. Each are making more now than the total they made while playing and, in several cases, more per year than in their entire playing careers. So assuming Curry’s income will drop by 1/3 after retirement is consistent with these top earners.

chart

This puts his total income from 2016 through the end of 2035 at over $1.5 billion. All of the above assumptions can prove true if Curry continues to ascend to super-star status, which would be helped if the Warriors win the championship this year. They could even prove low if Curry played longer and/or remained an icon for longer than 10 years after retiring. Thankfully, Curry has remained relatively injury free and our analysis assumes that he remains healthy. Curry is not only one of the most exciting players to watch, but is also becoming the most popular player with fans around the league. Curry now ranks second overall in total uniform sales, behind LeBron James.

So while the concept of Stephen Curry as a Unicorn (reaching $1 billion in value) started as a fun one to contemplate with our last post, further analysis reveals that it is actually possible that Fantex or some other entity could create a tracking stock that might reach that type of valuation.

As a VC, I would love to invest in him!

SoundBytes:

  • In the recent game against the Blazers there was further validation of Curry’s MVP bid. Curry delivered eight 3-pointers, hit 17 of 23 shots and went 7-of-7 in his 19-point fourth quarter. His last two threes were a combined distance of 55 feet, setting a new record for threes in a season and breaking his own record!
  • To understand just how well Curry shot, his Field Goal Efficiency was 91% (he had 8 threes bringing his equivalent field goals to 21/23). Not only was this higher than anyone who scored 40 points this year or took at least 20 shots in a game, we believe it may be among the highest ever for someone taking 20 shots in a game.
  • As a comparison, the two Portland stars, Aldredge and Lillian, each had strong games and scored 27 and 20 points, respectively. But, to do that, they took 46 shots between them (double that of Curry) and only scored 2 more points in total for the extra 23 shots!
  • The 4th quarter performance by Curry, cited above, translates to a 114% FGE rating, which is averaging more than 100% shooting as he scored 16 points on 7 shots. When foul shots are taken into account, his True Shooting % was 137% as he scored 19 points on 8 field goal attempts (counting the one on which he was fouled).To draw a comparison, when Russell Westbrook scored 54 points against Portland on April 12 he took 43 shots, 20 more than Curry (23 more if we include shots that led to foul shots).

Is Stephen Curry Becoming a Unicorn?

Why Curry should be the clear NBA MVP

Much has been written about the importance of discovering and investing early in “Unicorns”, companies that eventually cross the $1 billion valuation threshold. In basketball, teams make tough decisions as to whether to sign individual players to contracts that can be worth as much as $120 million or more over six years. The top few players can earn a billion dollars over their career when endorsements are added to the equation, assuming they can last as long as a Kobe Bryant or Tim Duncan. Clearly part of the road to riches is getting the recognition as one of the elite. This year, several players previously thought of as “quite good” are emerging in the quest to be thought of as “great”. Nothing can help a player put his stamp on such a claim as much as winning the MVP. In the spirit of trying to identify a future “Unicorn” in professional basketball, I thought it would be fun to analyze the current crop of contenders.

Given an unusual emergence of multiple stars, this year’s NBA MVP race is one of the most hotly contested in years. There are five legitimate candidates: Stephen Curry, Russell Westbrook, James Harden, Anthony Davis and LeBron James. All of them are having spectacular seasons and in most years that would be good enough for them to win. But only one can take the MVP crown. LeBron is the reigning king of the league and has long ago hoisted his flag atop the mountain. But, he has won the MVP title a number of times and while he remains a solid choice, he is not a clear choice. Therefore, it appears almost certain that most voters will favor a candidate who has yet to win. In the last few weeks Davis seems to have faded from consideration so, in this post, I will provide the analysis that has led me to determine that Curry is a more worthy recipient than Westbrook and Harden.

Scoring

Basketball columnists and analysts often focus too much of their evaluation of success on a player’s scoring average. In an attempt to help understand a player’s full value, John Hollinger created a Player Efficiency Rating (PER) that incorporates several statistics in the hope it provides a single rating that determines the best player. While it is a truly worthy effort, we feel there is quite a bit of judgement incorporated in what value to place on different statistics.  For example, it rewards players who take more shots even when the extra shots are 2-pointers at a low field goal percentage (taking extra 2-point shots at over a 31% increases the rating even though that is well below what the rest of his team would likely shoot). We would place more value on giving the ball up (and having a lower scoring average) than taking a low percentage shot.

I am surprised that the simplest calculation of scoring efficiency does not surface as a regularly reported statistic. Some sources occasionally report an “Adjusted Field Goal Percentage” (AFG%) that counts a 3-point field goal as worth 1.5 times a 2-point field goal. We believe this is the correct way of viewing a shooter’s effectiveness and called it field goal efficiency (FGE%). It calculates the percentage as the equivalent of 2-point field goals made per field goal attempt (FGA):

FGE% = (2-point shots made + 1.5 x 3-point shots made)/FGA

There is one statistic that analysts call True Shooting Percentage (TS%) that goes one step further. It also takes foul shots into account. It assumes that 1 of every 9 foul shots is part of a 3-point (or 4-point) play and therefore considers 2.25 foul shots as the same as one field goal attempt (since most pairs of foul shots replace a field goal attempt). TS% is calculated by adding the field goal attempt equivalent of foul shots to normal field goal attempts to determine the equivalent number of attempts used by a player. By dividing points scored by 2 we know how points scored equates to 2-point field goals made (FGME). This translated to the following formula for TS%:

Equivalent field goal attempts (EFGA) = FGA + FTA/2.25

FGME = points scored/2

TS% =FGME/EFGA

Now let’s compare Curry, Harden and Westbrook based on these statistics all on a per game basis:

Slide1

Harden and Westbrook are neck-and-neck in scoring average, each about four points per game higher than Curry. But Curry plays fewer minutes per game and takes fewer shots. His shooting efficiency at 58.6% is by far the highest of the three by a significant amount (a full 14% higher than Westbrook and 7% higher than Harden). It is also the highest in the league for players that have taken at least 8 shots per game (which includes all of the top 100 players by scoring average). At over 90%, Curry is the number one foul shooter in the league. But Harden and Westbrook are also hitting roughly 85% of their foul shots. Therefore, the fact that they get fouled much more than Curry brings each of their TS%s closer to Curry’s. Still, Curry is a whopping 10% higher than Westbrook and 2.5% higher than Harden. It is apparent that the scoring average advantage is more a function of Curry playing fewer minutes and being more selective in his shots.

To see the impact of this we calculated their scoring average per 36 minutes played (which we consider about average for a team’s star) and points scored per 25 equivalent field goals attempts:

Slide2

So, even if he played the same amount of time as Harden and Westbrook, Curry would trail in average points per game, primarily because he still would take fewer shots. But if he took the same number of equivalent shots he’d have a higher scoring average than both.

A Few Other Statistical Comparisons

While scoring efficiency is an important measure of a players value to his team, several other statistics like assists, rebounds, and steals are also considered quite relevant. To make comparisons fair, we adjusted to the average per 36 minutes for each:

Slide3

For steals, Westbrook and Curry are close to dead even with Harden about 11% behind. However, Westbrook is the clear leader in rebounds and has 7% more assists than Curry with both well ahead of Harden.

Each of these three players leads their team’s offense. They all control the ball attempting to score themselves or assist others in scoring without turning the ball over, as every turnover is a lost scoring opportunity. The ratio of assists to turnovers helps capture effectiveness as a guard. On the defensive end they each can compensate for a portion of their turnovers by stealing the ball. The ratio of steals to turnovers captures how well they are able defensively to partly compensate for depriving their team of a scoring opportunity. But attempts to steal the ball can lead to more personal fouls. The ratio of steals to personal fouls helps understand defensive effectiveness. Here are the comparisons:

Slide4

Harden and Westbrook are 25%-40% behind Curry in all of these categories. What the first ratio tells us is that Curry passes the ball more accurately and/or takes less risk so that he gets his assists without turning the ball over as frequently as the others. Another way of looking at it is that the extra 0.6 assists that Westbrook averages per 36 minutes comes at the expense of one extra turnover vs Curry.  The steal/turnover ratio tells us that for every 3 turnovers Curry has, he is able to get the ball back twice through steals. The others recover less than half of their turnovers through steals. Finally the steals/personal foul ratio shows that Curry is quite effective defensively with a ratio that is over 30% better than either of the others.

 

Curry Creates the Most Team Success

So, what is the bottom line that helps capture the impact of the various statistics we have shown? Of course one measure is the fact that Curry has helped his team achieve a much better record. What other measure should be considered in evaluating a potential MVP’s impact on a team? Given Curry’s extremely high Field Goal Effectiveness, does his taking fewer shots help the team more than Harden and Westbrook taking more shots and scoring more? The league average for scoring per game is roughly 99.9 points (through about 76 games of the season). Each of the three help their team score at a higher rate than that, but Curry has led the Warriors to the highest scoring per game in the league. The comparison:

charts

A natural question is whether this superior offensive performance comes at the expense of inferior defense.  So we should include the average points given up per game by each team to round out the picture. Notice the Warriors allow fewer points per game than the league average while both the Thunder and the Rockets allow more than the league average. The combination for the Warriors means that they have the highest plus/minus in the league by quite a bit (the Warrior’s 10.4 is 60% higher than the Clippers who are second at 6.5), and it is nearly double the sum of the plus/minus for the Rockets and Thunder combined.

Slide6

The league also maintains plus/minus differential by player. That is how many more points a team scores than opponents when that player is on the floor.  In all three cases, it seems clear the players are driving the team’s effectiveness as their differential exceeds that of the teams (meaning that without them on the floor, the other team, on average, outscores their team). This statistic takes offense and defense into account and helps measure the influence a player has on his team’s effectiveness.

Slide7

This means that Curry is responsible for a 12.0-point improvement in plus/minus when on the floor versus how the team does when he isn’t, while both Westbrook and Harden improve their team’s plus/minus by 5.0 points. Given his top score in plus/minus, much higher Field Goal Effectiveness and TS%, combined with driving the Warriors to the top record in the league, it seems that Curry should be the league MVP and is on his way to becoming a Unicorn. As a VC, I would love to invest in him!

SoundBytes:

  • The recent ESPN selection of the top 20 players of the past 20 years is quite enlightening in how well the NBA markets their elite players compared to other sports. Despite the fact that football and baseball have a multiple of the number of players and are more popular sports, five of the 20 were from the NBA:
    • Number 1: Michael Jordon
    • Number 2: LeBron James
    • Number 8: Kobe Bryant
    • Number 11: Shaquille O’Neal
    • Number 14: Tim Duncan
  • There were 3 from football (all quarterbacks) and 2 each from baseball, tennis and soccer. And one each from 6 other sports (hockey, boxing, golf, swimming, track and cycling).
  • The four emerging stars (this includes Anthony Davis) we have discussed all have the potential to be on a future such list but their status among the greatest will also be dependent on their ability to win multiple championships. Winning MVPs makes a player great, winning multiple championships makes them one of the greatest.
  • Last night’s game against the Blazers was further validation’s of Curry’s MVP bid. Curry delivered eight 3-pointers, hit 17 of 23 shots and went 7-of-7 in his 19-point fourth quarter. His last two threes were a combined distance of 55 feet, setting a new record for threes in season and breaking his own record!

How Healthy Is Our Economy?

In this era of globalization of the work force, the United States has become a country with a split personality. On the one hand, we continue to lead the world in innovation driven by a strong college and graduate education system (15 of the 20 top rated universities in the world are in the U.S., according to the Times Higher Education World rankings), a large population of risk-taking entrepreneurs, an influx of hard working, talented immigrants and the strength of the Venture Capital industry. This innovation is responsible for creating many jobs, as can be seen at the likes of Google, Apple, Tesla, Amazon, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Uber and many more rising stars.

On the other hand, we have failed as a country to remain competitive across the workforce. As a result, despite the many jobs created by innovators, the workforce as a portion of the population is contracting and currently is barely above recession level lows. Although this month’s jobs report suggests the employment picture is improving, it’s a mistake to think the falling unemployment rate from the January 2010 recession high of 10.6% to a recent level of 5.8% in February 2015 is proof the economy is healthy once more[1] . While the 2007 pre-downturn level was a much lower 4.3%, the degree of failure to recover is considerably bleaker than the current 5.8% level versus the pre-recession 4.3% difference would indicate.

Employment Rather than Unemployment is a Better Measure of Economic Health

The employment rate (the percentage of the population that has a job) is a far better indicator of the health of the economy than the unemployment rate (the % of those seeking jobs that don’t have one). People with jobs are what supports the economy and the mere fact that someone removes themselves from the workforce does not make the economy healthier. In fact, the percentage of the population that is not in the labor force is at its highest level in 36 years. In both January and February 2015, the seasonally unadjusted labor force participation rate was 62.5%. That means that 37.5% were not participating in the labor force[2] . The last time the labor force participation rate sunk to these levels was in 1978, when it was 62.8%. At that time, interest rates were soaring and the prime rate peaked at 11.75% later that year.

In 2007, 66.0% of the population was in the workforce (that is, sought a job) and 95.4% of those had a job, meaning 63.0% of the population were employed. In 2010, 64.7% of the population was still in the work force and 90.4% of those had a job, meaning that 58.5% of Americans were still employed during the lowest period in the downturn. How much of the 4.5 percentage points (or 450 basis points) loss of employment has been recovered? In 2014, only 62.9% of the population was in the workforce. So, despite the shrinkage in the unemployment rate (which was mostly due to fewer people seeking jobs), we now have 59.0% of the population working, a 50 basis point improvement from the low point of the recession. But there was a 450 basis point shrinkage in employment during the recession, so a 50 basis point improvement hardly qualifies as a true recovery!

Labor force & employment

The Law of Unintended Consequences Often Plagues the Best of Intentions

Our federal and state governments frequently pass laws that are intended to help workers. But often the cost to employers of fulfilling these new obligations has unintended consequences as added expense drives reaction. Examples:

1. Increase minimum wage: reaction by many employers is to replace domestic workers with ones in other countries and/or to increase the use of automation, reducing the work force. Although there are conflicting data on the impact of a minimum wage increase on unemployment, a 2013 study by the AAF found that a $1 increase in the minimum wage was associated with a 1.5% increase in the unemployment rate and a 0.18% decrease in the net job growth rate.

2. Taxing companies repatriating cash from abroad at high rates: Reaction by many corporations is to decide not to repatriate the cash and, instead, to re-invest it by expanding operations in other countries instead of in the United States, causing a loss of potential jobs here.

3. Cities controlling the number of taxis allowed (through requirement to purchase a medallion): Leading to the success of Uber as unavailability of sufficient numbers of cabs during high requirement periods causes a massive conversion to Uber and a loss of income for taxi drivers.

Why is the economy failing to recover to prior levels? My belief is that the combination of the Affordable Care Act (a $2,000 cost per employee), increasing minimum wages and strong competition from abroad have all contributed to the problem. Furthermore, they have not only held back employment increases but also pushed the part-time portion of the workforce to about 19% (it was 13.5% in the late 1960s and between 17% and 18% in the early 2000s).

Part-time

Finally, while our college and graduate education is outstanding, the U.S. K-12 education ranks quite low amongst nations:
1. 36th in mathematics for 15 year olds[3]
2. 24th in reading for 15 year olds[3]
3. 28th in science for 15 years olds[3]
4. 14th in cognitive skills and educational attainment[4]
5. 11th in fourth-grade mathematics and 9th in eighth-grade mathematics[5]
6. 7th in fourth-grade science and 10th in eighth-grade science[5]

Much of our priority as a country tends to emphasize short-term gratification over long-term issues like investing in primary education. If we make workers more expensive than in other parts of the developed world through requirements of expensive benefits, high minimum wages, heavy taxation, etc., then we need to make sure they are more skilled through better education and training. One of the policies that helped offset this in the past is prioritizing ease of immigration for those at the high end of the spectrum who could help create jobs.

If we fail to change our approach going forward, I continued to be concerned for America’s long-term future.

[1] Unemployment Rate (Not Seasonally Adjusted), United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, http://data.bls.gov/timeseries/LNU04000000
[2] http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/empsit.pdf
[3] Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Program for International Student Assessment (PISA). 65 educational systems ranked.
[4] Pearson Global Index of Cognitive Skills and Educational Attainment compares the performance of 39 countries and one region (Hong Kong) on two categories of education: Cognitive Skills and Educational Attainment. The Index provides a snapshot of the relative performance of countries based on their education outputs.
[5] International Study Center at Boston College. Fourth graders in 57 countries or education systems took the math and science tests, while 56 countries or education systems administered the tests to eighth graders.

Soundbytes:

– It will be interesting to see what the impact of the largest salary-cap jump in league history will be on the 2016-17 season. For example, LeBron James could take his salary from about $22 million next season to around $30 million if he signs for the maximum salary in 2016. This could have significant implications for many free agents and there might be those who accept only one-year contracts so they can retest the market in 2016, when there is more money available.

Top 10 Predictions for 2015

I’ve been very lucky to have a history of correctly predicting trends, especially in identifying stocks that would outperform. I say lucky because even assuming one gets the analysis right, the prediction can still be wrong due to poor management execution and/or unforeseen events. Last year I highlighted 10 trends that would occur in 2014 and I’m pleased that each proved accurate (see 2014 Predictions). Rather than pat myself on the back for past performance, my high-risk, A-type personality makes me go back into the fray for 2015. Last year’s highlighted stocks, Tesla and Facebook, were up 48% and 43%, respectively, from January 3 to December 31, 2014 vs. 15% for the Nasdaq and under 13% for the S&P 500. This year, I’ll identify more than two stocks to watch as I am probably over-confident due to past success. But because I’m not doing the level of work that I did on Wall Street, there is significant risk in assuming I’m correct.

So consider yourself forewarned.

  1. Facebook will have a strong 2015. I have not sold my Facebook shares (I’m up over 3x since acquiring them in mid-2013). Momentum appears just as solid as it did a year ago and revenue and earnings multiples have contracted. In 2014, revenue grew over 60% and earnings per share nearly 100% (using analyst estimates for Q4) vs the share price increase of 43%. Beware that high growth stocks can go through periods of multiple contraction, but Facebook ($75/share) seems well positioned to continue to see revenue surge and EPS increase even faster.
  1. Tesla should have another good year in 2015. I continue to hold my stock and think it will perform well despite expecting numerous wild gyrations ($192/share). Because the SUV launch has been delayed to 2016, revenue growth could taper off from the approximately 75% in 2014 (using analyst Q4 estimates). Investors could fear that lower gas prices will impact people’s desire for an all-electric car. But, do you believe customers paying $90,000 for a Tesla are doing so to save on fuel? I don’t. Tesla sales will be helped by: increasing distribution, more locations to charge one’s car (reducing one of the biggest buying inhibitors), more knowledge of the car, increasing awareness of its relative price attractiveness given the new $136,000 BMW I8 high-end sports hybrid and continued governmental incentives to buy an electric vehicle.
  1. Amazon should rebound in 2015. Last year the stock was down over 22% for a variety of short-term reasons. Amazon 2014 revenue is expected to be about 20% over 2013 revenue. Its competitive advantages in retail, if anything, improved as its local delivery capabilities continued to dominate competition (we expect Amazon to leverage this further by opening showrooms/ordering centers in several cities in 2015) and Amazon Prime service saw further and further adoption. But, 2014 was a year of substantial investment and this hurt the stock ($288/share). Such investment stimulating increased market share has occurred before and the stock typically bounces back subsequently. While it doesn’t have the growth dynamics of Facebook or Tesla and I don’t own the stock yet, I believe it is worth considering for any portfolio.
  1. Netflix power in the industry should increase in 2015. Like HBO before it, Netflix’ superior economics provides the opportunity to create more of its own proprietary content. It also may see more opportunity to launch movies online simultaneous to their launch in theaters – the success of The Interview could help drive this trend and no one is better positioned than Netflix to exploit it. After peaking mid-year at $480/share, the stock closed 2014 slightly down from a year earlier and is now at $332.
  1. Azure portfolio company, Yik Yak, will continue to emerge as the next important social network. This will cause a number of entrenched competitors to modify their products to try to slow Yik Yak growth. The most vulnerable public entity is Twitter as Yik Yak is the next, more modern version of Twitter. Given Twitter’s large user base, this will not likely affect its stock in 2015, but it is something to monitor.
  1. Curated Commerce will continue to emerge. This trend was one we forecast in last year’s blog and appears to have solid resonance. A number of startups in the category saw valuations rise to $300M – $1B including Honest Company, Birchbox, Stitchfix, and Dollar Shave Club. There is more to come as many shoppers want a better shopping experience from etailers. To date, most web shopping starts with knowing what item one wants to buy rather than “browsing”. The best brick and mortar retailers create a shopping experience by stocking items that are pleasing to those that visit their store. Most of us know people that prefer shopping in a particular store due to this experience. This trend is emerging on the web and will continue in 2015. At Azure, we continue to believe in this model and made investments into Julep, Le Tote, The Bouqs and Filter Easy in 2014.
  1. Wearable activity will slow. With the exception of the iWatch which is expected to release in early 2015, the hype around wearable devices will be more muted. Fitness trackers, wearable cameras, smart watches, heart rate monitors, and GPS tracking devices will largely be replaced by phone or watch-based apps. An early indication of this trend was an October 2014 report that claimed Apple had plans to remove Fitbit products from its physical retail stores. 
  1. Robotics will continue to make further inroads with products that provide value. Specifically, the commercial use of UAVs and drones will continue to accelerate. The recent FAA issuance of permits to use drones to monitor crops and photograph properties for sale is an initial first step in a broader application of UAVs. Companies involved in infrastructure and software related to UAVs will continue to attract more interest. 
  1. Part-time employees and replacing people with technology will continue to be a larger part of the work force. The Affordable care Act and increasing minimum wages will each be a force in driving this trend.
  1. 3D printers will be increasingly used in smaller batch and custom manufacturing.

Soundbytes.

  • Switched to an iPhone from Blackberry and while this may sound prehistoric, I will miss many of the efficiencies of a Blackberry that the iPhone lacks; but I had to change because the iPhone is so much better for online, graphics and had apps I felt were mandatory and it made more sense to switch than to buy the newest Blackberry.
  • Wanted to put a stake in the ground predicting the Cavaliers will have a much better second half of the season assuming LeBron is healthy.

Wal-Mart is making progress in ecommerce but it is less than people think

Many years ago it became obvious to some of us that online retail would continue to grow at a much faster pace than brick and mortar stores. This appeared to be less obvious to traditional retailers until more recently. In 2001, I suggested to some colleagues that Wal-Mart should acquire Amazon to gain an edge in online retail (Amazon stock was about $5 a share at the time). This idea was scoffed at. I bought Amazon stock but, clearly, didn’t maximize my execution as I sold it within 18 months for 3 times the return (it’s now $317). I’m guessing there were also some prescient investment bankers who received a similar response after suggesting that Wal-Mart buy Amazon. Who knows what the world would be like today had that occurred, as Amazon could easily have been derailed under Wal-Mart management. Continue reading

A Different Perspective on LinkedIn, The Dominant Business Social network

A high proportion of people I know use Facebook as their social network and LinkedIn as their business network. LinkedIn has executed well in capturing a massive audience of business users with over 300 million members, especially in North America which has approximately one third of the network’s members (with Europe quickly catching up). Having done so, it is well positioned to replicate what Facebook has done on the social side – capture business discussions. The question is how can they best do this? LinkedIn’s Influencer Series identifies the most influential voices on LinkedIn and invites them to allow LinkedIn to distribute their articles. The distribution goes to the LinkedIn feeds of people who have opted into seeing posts from each writer. However, the relatively small number of posts and limited distribution doesn’t drive the user value and uptick in page views that could be possible if LinkedIn is to own business discussion in the way that Facebook owns social discussion. Earlier this year LinkedIn recognized this opportunity and opened its Influencer programs to its wider member base with hopes that it would generate more engagement. The move came shortly after the company disclosed that page views declined for the second consecutive quarter.

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Will Satya’s manifesto make Microsoft a tech leader again?

The CEO correctly lays out some of the ways the world is changing, but can the software maker really change? 

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella recently emailed Microsoft employees a speech that I’ll refer to as his “Satya Manifesto.” In it, he points out that the software maker must make fundamental strategic and cultural changes to deliver on his vision of being “the productivity and platform company for the mobile-first and cloud-first world.” He further states: “We will reinvent productivity to empower every person and every organization on the planet to do more and achieve more.”

I was impressed with his willingness to shift Microsoft’s focus to the mainstream of where the world is moving. Yet, I couldn’t help compare his memo to a 1999 speech by Carly Fiorina after assuming the CEO role at Hewlett Packard. In her speech she said, “…we are a single global ecosystem – wired, connected, overlapping …”

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